Category Archives: podcast

Examined Sport: Russell, “Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With?” Part 2

J.S. Russell’s “Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With?”, published in the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport in 1999, presents a theory of sport adjudication that Russell argues better explains sport, the role of officials and umpires, and guides those officials in officiating their sports. Russell’s paper is one of the first explicit attempts to explain and apply interpretivism, one of the central philosophical accounts of sport. This is part two of two episodes on Russell’s paper. Part One.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

You Tube: Watch Here

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

1 Comment

Filed under baseball, Examined Sport, Officiating, podcast, Uncategorized

Examined Sport: Russell, “Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With?” Part 1

J.S. Russell’s “Are Rules All an Umpire Has to Work With?”, published in the Journal of the Philosophy of Sport in 1999, presents a theory of sport adjudication that Russell argues better explains sport, the role of officials and umpires, and guides those officials in officiating their sports. Russell’s paper is one of the first explicit attempts to explain and apply interpretivism, one of the central philosophical accounts of sport. This is part one of two episodes on Russell’s paper.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

You Tube: Watch Here

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

1 Comment

Filed under baseball, Examined Sport, Officiating, podcast

Examined Sport: Randolph Feezell, “Sportsmanship”

In his 1986 article, “Sportsmanship,” Randolph Feezell argues that James Keating’s classic account of sportsmanship goes too far in radically separating sports and athletics. In this episode, we examine Feezell’s criticism of Keating and then look at Feezell’s account of sportsmanship as a virtue between seriousness and non-seriousness.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

You Tube: Watch Here

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

Leave a comment

Filed under Examined Sport, play, podcast, sportsmanship

Examined Sport: Warren Fraleigh: “Why the Good Foul is Not Good”

The intentional foul highlights why it is important to understand the nature of rules in sports. In this episode of Examined Sport, I discuss Warren Fraleigh’s “Why the Good Foul is Not Good.” In this 1982 paper, Fraleigh presents an influential critique of the tactical intentional foul, igniting decades of discussion about the ethics of the intentional or ‘good’ foul.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

Watch Here:

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

1 Comment

Filed under basketball, Examined Sport, Fouls, podcast

Examined Sport: The Ethos of Games

In this episode of Examined Sport, I discuss Fred D’Agostino’s “The Ethos of Games.” In this 1981 paper, D’Agostino critiques Formalist view of games and defends an alternative theory we call conventionalism.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

Watch Here:

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

Leave a comment

Filed under Examined Sport, games, podcast, rule-violations

Examined Sport: Bernard Suits’ “The Elements of Sport”

In this episode of Examined Sport, I examine Bernard Suits’ “The Elements of Sport.” This 1973 essay applies Suits’ definition of game-playing (see the “What is a Game?” episode) to sport.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

Watch Here:

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

Leave a comment

Filed under Examined Sport, games, Philosophy, podcast

Examined Sport: Bernard Suits, “What is a Game?”

In this episode of Examined Sport, I examine Bernard Suits’ “What is a Game?” Suits presents his influential definition of game-playing in this discipline-defining article first published in 1967.

Subscribe on iTunes:

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Listen Here

Watch Here:

Related Links and Information:

Opening and Closing Musical Credits:

1 Comment

Filed under Examined Sport, games, Philosophy, podcast

Announcing: Examined Sport podcast

My old Sports Ethics Show podcast has been on hiatus for far too long. Instead of just starting that back up again, I am relaunching it with a new name, Examined Sport, and a new concept.

The concept is ten to fifteen minute podcasts that focus on arguments or concepts from the philosophy of sport and analyze or explain them in simple and direct ways.

I will look at classic, discipline-defining articles, exciting newly published works, and dig deep to rediscover important but not as well-known papers.

Examined Sport mission:

  1. Extend the reach of the philosophy of sport literature.
  2. Be a resource for students to learn more about philosophy of sport.
  3. Highlight essential themes of the literature.
  4. Rediscover important and interesting papers.
  5. Spur new thought and research in the philosophy of sport.

The first episode is, logically, on Bernard Suits classic article: “What is a Game?” It will be released Tuesday, May 30. Episodes will follow every week or two after that.

You can subscribe to the podcast on iTunes. You can also watch each episode on The Sports Ethicist YouTube channel. (Archives of the old show are also available on iTunes and YouTube.)

If you have ideas for the show, let me know by email or comment below.

Leave a comment

Filed under podcast, Site Announcements

MPR Podcast: sports and domestic violence

On Thursday morning (April 28), I took part of a discussion of sports and domestic violence on Minnesota Public Radio. MPR archived the show as a podcast, available here: http://www.mprnews.org/story/2016/04/28/sports-ethics

Leave a comment

Filed under podcast, Sports Ethics, violence

The Sports Ethics Show: Sport Studies Symposium 2015

The 4th annual Sport Studies Symposium was held April 24, 2015. In this episode, the symposium participants discuss the ideas raised by the papers given at the symposium. In the first part of the episode, Mike Perry and Shawn E. Klein talk with Matt Adamson, Stephen Mosher, and Synthia Syndor about the nature of sport studies,its past, and its future. In the second part, Shawn and Mike talk with Aaron Harper, Stephanie Quinn, and Zach Smith about legal realism and sport, sport in the ancient world, and theology of sport.

Show Links:

Listen to this episode.

Subscribe to the podcast in iTunes: iTunes Subscribe

Subscribe_on_iTunes_Badge_US-UK_110x40_0824

Leave a comment

Filed under ancient, Conferences, law, play, podcast, rockford university, Sports Studies, theology